about us

Heather

After years of yo-yo dieting and trying every diet on the market, Heather decided she wanted to make healthy lifestyle changes that would last.  Influenced by her vegetarian sister and vegan aunt, she researched vegetarian and vegan diets.  Watching a video clip advertising the movie Earthlings (about animal cruelty) was her deciding factor to give up eating meat.  Heather became vegetarian in May 2012. It was a relatively easy switch and she dropped 30 pounds within two months!   Soon after, Heather decided to embrace the vegan way of life.  It is a progress.  She is not perfect but loves the positive changes that being vegan has  influenced in all aspects of her life - physically, mentally and spiritually.


Dana

The vegan sister with superb "from scratch" baking skills!  
When people ask if I'm vegan, I reply "No, but I try to make vegan choices."

  

RB or Rosebud or Budladi

Our mother's sister!  Our wonderful aunt! Also known as the Beegan Vegan! 
Who LUVS to cook! and enjoys making everything from scratch! 
Including CHEESE! Dairy Free Cheeses!
Did someone mention Baking? YES!
Having been vegetarian most of her adult life, 
it didn't take much to give up the dairy and cheese! 
And RB has NEVER looked back! 
"My life is SEW much better! I am SEW healthy, and full of vibrant energy. 
I could NEVER do dairy again! EVER!"
Currently volunteering for PurePlantRoots.org and on the Grand Rapids Veg Fest Board, 
RB is working on a vegan cookbook due out late August 2017. 
Another new adventure is the Vegan University and conducting Vegan 101 Cooking Classes! These classes are held throughout the Greater Grand Rapids area four times a year. 
The focus of these classes is for those who want to learn How to Cook All Things Vegan.
  

Jeannebug

Mom!  Fabulous baker and smoothie extraordinaire!
Jeannebug is a fabulous and  wonderful cook!




4 comments:

  1. Many many years of playing with the VEGAN life. Kept it SEW quiet and would sneak all the healthy things into recipes without saying a word! Never ever liked red meats, suffered thru years of eating the white crap. Finally after years of listening to the doctors tell me that I have to give up dairy due to allergies, I said OK, then it's VEGAN! Haven't looked back once!
    Health is SEW much better.

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  2. Why a Vegan Diet or better yet - RAW:

    An uncooked vegan diet, consisting mainly of plant-derived foods and devoid of animal-derived foods, is naturally low in saturated fat but high in antioxidants. According to a 2001 "Rheumatology" journal study in which researchers studied the effects on a vegan diet on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, researchers led by I. Hafstrom at the Huddinge University Hospital's Department of Rheumatology in Stockholm, Sweden, concluded that a vegan diet improved arthritis symptoms. Scientists speculate that vegan diets dramatically reduce the overall amount of fat in the diet, altering fat composition. This may affect the body's immune process. Furthermore, patients lose weight on a vegan diet, which may also lead to symptom relief. And because vegetables are rich in antioxidants that neutralize free radicals so that they can't attack body parts such as the joints, they may ease joint pain and inflammation.

    Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/394987-arthritis-antioxidants/#ixzz25oJWLn6O

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  3. Foods You Eat May influence how your joints feel!
    Increasing your intakes of certain fruits and veggies does appear to be a sound way to protect against and fight arthritis. Here
    are the top 14 fruits and vegetables to consider:

    1. Oranges: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition study found that a modest increase in the antioxidant beta-cryptoxanthin intake, equivalent to one glass of freshly squeezed orange juice per day, is associated with a reduced risk of developing inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

    2. Berries: Berries are all great sources of antioxidants and vitamin C. Blueberries have been ranked number 1 in terms of antioxidant concentrations, but cranberries, blackberries, strawberries and raspberries are good choices too.

    3. Kiwi: One kiwi provides almost double the vitamin C of an orange, according to the California Kiwifruit Commission. Vitamin C is associated with a reduced risk of arthritis.

    4. Apples: Cornell University researchers found that apples contain antioxidants that fight inflammation (along with allergies, cancer and viruses).

    5. Cherries: According to Eve Campanelli, PhD in Prevention magazine, after drinking two glasses of black cherry juice (four ounces of juice with four ounces of water) twice a day, 85 percent of her patients experienced at least partial relief from their arthritis
    pain. Further, the effect continued even after the patients stopped drinking the juice.

    6. Parsley: Parsley contains beta-carotene, making it a useful ingredient for those with arthritis, says Cherie Calbom, M.S., a certified nutritionist in Kirkland, Washington.

    7. Prunes: These dried plums are antioxidant powerhouses. Researchers at the Center on Aging at Tufts University in Boston found that prunes had more than twice the
    antioxidant power than any other fruit or vegetable in their study.

    8. Carrots: They're rich in the antioxidants vitamin A and carotenoids.

    9. Broccoli: Calbom says broccoli is helpful for arthritis because of its beta-carotene content. It's also a rich source of vitamin C.

    10. Pineapple: Pineapple is rich in the enzyme bromelain, a powerful and natural anti-inflammatory agent.

    11. Beans: "The protein in beans helps to replace body proteins broken down by inflammation," says Denise Cedar, a Salem, Oregon-based dietitian.

    12. Red Grapes: Red grapes are loaded with antioxidants that can help reduce inflammation associated with arthritis (as well as fight heart disease and cancer).

    13. Tomatoes: Tomatoes are an excellent source of the antioxidant lycopene, which has been found to help fight degenerative diseases (and reduce the risk of prostate and other cancers). Cooked tomatoes (tomato sauce or paste, marinara sauce, ketchup, etc.) are best when it
    comes to lycopene.

    14. Sweet Potatoes: These are loaded with antioxidant vitamins A, C and E. One half-cup serving provides twice the Recommended Daily Amount of vitamin E.

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  4. The above from: http://www.forhealthyjoints.com/top14foods.html

    ReplyDelete